Short Research Report

AIMED AT ITCHEDD: A proof-of-concept study to evaluate a mnemonic-based approach to clinical reasoning in the emergency medical care educational setting

A Makkink, C Vincent-Lambert

Abstract


Background. Mnemonics are used as memory aids for teaching, learning and practice in a variety of educational contexts and domains. Mnemonics are commonly used to assist in the recall of critical components of complex or important clinical processes. The AIMED AT ITCHEDD mnemonic was designed to assist students to recall and apply steps associated with a structured clinical decision-making process.

Objective. To obtain the views and opinions of a sample of educators and students regarding the perceived value of AIMED AT ITCHEDD.

Method. A prospective, purposive design was followed, making use of an online questionnaire that consisted of 18 Likert-type questions, together with areas allowing for open, written comments. A total of 47 responses were received. Quantitative data from the closed questions were descriptively analysed. Thematic analysis was conducted on the narratives provided to determine emerging themes.

Results. Despite concerns being raised relating to its length, AIMED AT ITCHEDD was seen as a valuable tool for clinical teaching, learning and practice by the majority of respondents.

Conclusion. As a process mnemonic, AIMED AT ITCHEDD is perceived as having the potential to guide both students and practitioners with the critical thinking and decision-making processes associated with patient assessment, diagnosis and management. Further research is required to assess and quantify the extent to which the application of AIMED AT ITCHEDD improves clinical performance.


Authors' affiliations

A Makkink, Department of Emergency Medical Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Johannesburg, Doornfontein Campus, South Africa

C Vincent-Lambert, Department of Emergency Medical Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Johannesburg, Doornfontein Campus, South Africa

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Keywords

Mnemonic; Medical intervention; Critical thinking

Cite this article

African Journal of Health Professions Education 2018;10(2):76-78. DOI:10.7196/AJHPE.2018.v10i2.543

Article History

Date submitted: 2018-07-06
Date published: 2018-07-06

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